Occupational Safety And Health Administration

Occupational Safety and Health Administration in the United States

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in Environmental Law

The agency responsible for workplace safety. It promulgates the regulations that determine how the Occupational Health and Safety Act applies to specific situations. Like the Environmental Protection Agency, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is a regulatory agency. Thus, its regulations have the force of law. It also has enforcement and inspection authority.
Based on “Environment and the Law. A Dictionary”.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration

Introduction to Occupational Safety and Health Administration

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), agency of the U.S. Department of Labor established in 1971 pursuant to the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. Its main responsibilities are to provide for occupational safety by reducing hazards in the workplace and enforcing mandatory job safety standards and to implement and improve health programs for workers. OSHA regulations and standards apply to most private businesses in the U.S.

From its beginnings, OSHA has been a controversial agency that has drawn much criticism from both business and labor groups. Businesses have charged that the agency’s regulations are difficult to understand and often unreasonably rigid; that penalties are unfair, paperwork is excessive, and the cost of compliance is burdensome to small companies. Labor, on the other hand, has called OSHA’s enforcement procedures weak and complained that the agency has failed to reduce occupational hazards. Since 1977 the agency has made an effort to concentrate on dangerous industries and to eliminate out-of-date regulations. Meanwhile, OSHA is being challenged by some businesses in the courts.

The agency, directed by the assistant secretary for occupational safety and health, is headquartered in Washington, D.C. It has ten regional offices located throughout the U.S.” (1)

Resources

Notes and References

Guide to Occupational Safety and Health Administration

About U.S. Federal Departments

Federal Departments, Department of Agriculture, Department of Commerce, Department of Defense (including Department of Defense Purpose, Department of Defense Organization, Department of Defense Liaison of Command and Department of Defense Supporting Agencies), Department of Education, Department of Energy

(including Department of Energy Purpose, Department of Energy Organization and Department of Energy Research and Development), Department of Health and Human Services (including Department of Health and Human Services History and Department of Health and Human Services Agencies and Services), Department of Homeland Security (including Department of Homeland Security Organization and Functions, Department of Homeland Security Origins and Department of Homeland Security Supporting Agencies), Department of Housing and Urban Development, Department of Justice (including Department of Justice Functions, Department of Justice Structure and Department of Justice Associated Agencies), Department of Labor, Department of National Defence, Department of State (including Department of State Administration and Department of State Bureaus), Department of the Air Force, Department of the Army, Department of the Interior (including Department of the Interior Functions and Department of the Interior Principal Agencies), Department of the Navy, Department of the Treasury, Department of Transportation, Department of Veterans Affairs (including the Department of Veterans Affairs Service Categories, Department of Veterans Affairs Benefits Available and GI Bill of Rights) and Department of War.

Occupational Safety And Health Administration in State Statute Topics

Introduction to Occupational Safety And Health Administration (U.S.) (State statute topic)

The purpose of Occupational Safety And Health Administration is to provide a broad appreciation of the Occupational Safety And Health Administration legal topic. Select from the list of U.S. legal topics for information (other than Occupational Safety And Health Administration).

Resources

Further Reading

Occupational Safety And Health Administration: Open and Free Legal Research of US Law

Federal Primary Materials

The U.S. federal government system consists of executive, legislative, and judicial branches, each of which creates information that can be the subject of legal research about Occupational Safety And Health Administration. This part provides references, in relation to Occupational Safety And Health Administration, to the legislative process, the federal judiciary, and the primary sources of federal law (cases, statutes, and regulations).

Federal primary materials about Occupational Safety And Health Administration by content types:

Laws and Regulations

US Constitution
Federal Statutory Codes and Legislation

Federal Case Law and Court Materials

U.S. Courts of Appeals
United States courts of appeals, inclouding bankruptcy courts and bankcruptcy appellate panels:

Federal Administrative Materials and Resources

Presidential Materials

Materials that emanate from the President’s lawmaking function include executive orders for officers in departments and agencies and proclamations for announcing ceremonial or commemorative policies. Presidential materials available include:

Executive Materials

Federal Legislative History Materials

Legislative history traces the legislative process of a particular bill (about Occupational Safety And Health Administration and other subjects) for the main purpose of determining the legislators’ intent behind the enactment of a law to explain or clarify ambiguities in the language or the perceived meaning of that law (about Occupational Safety And Health Administration or other topics), or locating the current status of a bill and monitoring its progress.

State Administrative Materials and Resources

State regulations are rules and procedures promulgated by state agencies (which may apply to Occupational Safety And Health Administration and other topics); they are a binding source of law. In addition to promulgating regulations, state administrative boards and agencies often have judicial or quasi-judicial authority and may issue administrative decisions affecting Occupational Safety And Health Administration. Finding these decisions can be challenging. In many cases, researchers about Occupational Safety And Health Administration should check state agency web sites for their regulations, decisions, forms, and other information of interest.

State rules and regulations are found in codes of regulations and administrative codes (official compilation of all rules and regulations, organized by subject matter). Search here:

State opinions of the Attorney General (official written advisory opinions on issues of state law related to Occupational Safety And Health Administration when formerly requested by a designated government officer):

Tools and Forms

Law in Other Regions

*This resource guide is updated frequently. However, if you notice something is wrong or not working, or any resources that should be added, please notify us in any of the "Leave a Comment" area.

Leave a Comment