Representative

Representative in the United States

Representative Definition

One who represents or is in the place of another. One having lawful authority to act in behalf of the property and bind the owner in regard thereto. (…) In legislation, it signifies one who has been elected a member of that branch of the legislature called the “house of representatives.” The executor or administrator of a deceased person is called the “personal representative,” to distinguish him from the “real representative,” or heir at law. (1)

Definition of Investment adviser representative in the Uniform Securities Act (2002)

“Investment adviser representative” means an individual employed by or associated with an investment adviser or federal covered investment adviser and who makes any recommendations or otherwise gives investment advice regarding securities, manages accounts or portfolios of clients, determines which recommendation or advice regarding securities should be given, provides investment advice or holds herself or himself out as providing investment advice, receives compensation to solicit, offer, or negotiate for the sale of or for selling investment advice, or supervises employees who perform any of the foregoing.

The term does not include an individual who:

  • performs only clerical or ministerial acts;
  • is an agent whose performance of investment advice is solely incidental to the individual acting as an agent and who does not receive special compensation for investment advisory services;
  • is employed by or associated with a federal covered investment adviser (2); or
  • is excluded by rule adopted or order issued under the Uniform Securities Act (2002).

Political Representatives

Senators and representatives are elected to represent people. But what does that really mean? They cast hundreds of votes during each session of Congress. Many of those votes involve quite routine, relatively unimportant matters; for example, a bill to designate a week in May as National Wild Flower Week. But many of those votes, including some on matters of organization and procedure, are cast on matters of far-reaching import.

In broad terms, each lawmaker has four voting options. He or she can vote as a trustee, as a delegate, as a partisan, or as a politico:

  • Trustees believe that each question they face must be decided on its merits. Conscience and independent judgment are their guides. Trustees call issues as they see them, regardless of the views held by their constituents or by any of the other groups that seek to influence their decisions.
  • Delegates see themselves as the agents of those who elected them. They believe that they should vote the way they think “the folks back home” would want. They are willing to suppress their own views, ignore those of their party’s leaders, and turn a deaf ear to the arguments of colleagues and of special interests from outside their constituencies.
  • Those lawmakers who owe their first allegiance to their political party are partisans. They feel duty-bound to vote in line with the party platform and the wishes of their party’s leaders. Most studies of legislators’ voting behavior show that partisanship is the leading factor influencing their votes on most important measures.
  • Políticos attempt to combine the basic elements of the trustee, delegate, and partisan roles. They try to balance these often conflicting factors: their own views of what is best for their constituents and/or the nation as a whole, the political facts of life, and the peculiar pressures of the moment.

Representative in Foreign Legal Encyclopedias

For starting research in the law of a foreign country:

Link Description
Representative Representative in the World Legal Encyclopedia.
Representative Representative in the European Legal Encyclopedia.
Representative Representative in the Asian Legal Encyclopedia.
Representative Representative in the UK Legal Encyclopedia.
Representative Representative in the Australian Legal Encyclopedia.

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Accredited Representative in Immigration Law

In this area of law, Accredited Representative means: A person who is approved by the Board of Immigration Appeals to represent aliens before the Immigration Courts and the Board. He or she must work for a specific nonprofit, religious, charitable, social service, or similar organization. The organization must be authorized by the Board to represent aliens.

Resources

Notes

  1. This definition of Representative Is based on the The Cyclopedic Law Dictionary
  2. Unless the individual has a “place of business” in this State as that term is defined by rule adopted under Section 203A of the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. Section 80b-3a) and is (i) an “investment adviser representative” as that term is defined by rule adopted under Section 203A of the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. Section 80b-3a); or (ii) not a “supervised person” as that term is defined in Section 202(a)(25) of the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. Section 80b-2(a)(25))

See Also

 

Further Reading (Articles)

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE DUNCAN HUNTER (R-CA) HOLDS A JOINT HEARING WITH THE HOUSE INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS COMMITTEE ON E.U. WEAPONS SALES, Political Transcript Wire; April 14, 2005

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MICHAEL G. OXLEY (R-OH) HOLDS JOINT HEARING WITH THE HOUSE RESOURCES COMMITTEE ON LAND TITLE GRANT PROCEDURES FOR NATIVE AMERICANS, Political Transcript Wire; July 20, 2005

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE RICHARD H. BAKER (R-LA) AND U.S. REPRESENTATIVE SUE W. KELLY (R-NY) HOLDS A JOINT HEARING ON THE TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE ACT, Political Transcript Wire; October 2, 2006

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MICHAEL G. OXLEY (R-OH) HOLDS HEARING ON 9/11 COMMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS, Political Transcript Wire; September 22, 2004

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MICHAEL G. OXLEY (R-OH) HOLDS HEARING ON THE FISCAL YEAR 2006 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BUDGET, Political Transcript Wire; April 6, 2005

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MICHAEL G. OXLEY (R-OH) HOLDS HEARING ON SARBANES-OXLEY ACT, Political Transcript Wire; April 21, 2005

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE SPENCER BACHUS (R-AL) HOLDS JOINT HEARING WITH THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON HOUSING AND COMMUNITY OPPORTUNITY ON MORTGAGE, Political Transcript Wire; May 24, 2005

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MICHAEL G. OXLEY (R-OH) HOLDS HEARING ON REAL ESTATE COMPETITION, Political Transcript Wire; June 15, 2005

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MICHAEL J. OXLEY (R-OH) HOLDS A HEARING TO RECEIVE TESTIMONY ON THE FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD’S SEMIANNUAL MONETARY POLICY REPORT, Political Transcript Wire; February 15, 2006

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MICHAEL G. OXLEY (R-OH) HOLDS HEARING ON MARKUP, Political Transcript Wire; April 27, 2005

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE SPENCER BACHUS (R-AL) HOLDS JOINT HEARING WITH THE DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL MONETARY POLICY, TRADE AND, Political Transcript Wire; May 11, 2005;

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE CHRISTOPHER SMITH (R-NJ) HOLDS HEARING ON TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS, Political Transcript Wire; September 21, 2004

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MICHAEL OXLEY (R-OH) HOLDS HEARING ON THE FEDERAL RESERVE’S REPORT ON MONETARY POLICY AND THE STATE OF THE, Political Transcript Wire; February 17, 2005

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MICHAEL OXLEY (R-OH) HOLDS HEARING ON DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT OVERSIGHT, Political Transcript Wire; March 2, 2005;

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MICHAEL G. OXLEY (R-OH) HOLDS HEARING ON GOVERNMENT-SPONSORED ENTERPRISES REFORM, Political Transcript Wire; April 13, 2005

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE JERRY LEWIS (R-CA) HOLDS A HEARING ON THE FISCAL YEAR 2007 BUDGET FOR THE U.S. LEGISLATIVE BRANCH, Political Transcript Wire; March 16, 2006

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MICHAEL G. OXLEY (R-OH) HOLDS HEARING ON TERRORIST FINANCING, Political Transcript Wire; August 23, 2004

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MICHAEL G. OXLEY (R-OH) HOLDS HEARING ON FINANCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION, Political Transcript Wire; September 8, 2004

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MICHAEL G. OXLEY (R-OH) HOLDS A HEARING ON THE FEDERAL RESERVE’S MONETARY POLICY REPORT, Political Transcript Wire; July 20, 2006

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MICHAEL G. OXLEY (R-OH) HOLDS HEARING ON THE INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL SYSTEM, Political Transcript Wire; April 19, 2005

Representative: Open and Free Legal Research of US Law

Federal Primary Materials

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Federal primary materials about Representative by content types:

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Federal Statutory Codes and Legislation

Federal Case Law and Court Materials

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Presidential Materials

Materials that emanate from the President’s lawmaking function include executive orders for officers in departments and agencies and proclamations for announcing ceremonial or commemorative policies. Presidential materials available include:

Executive Materials

Federal Legislative History Materials

Legislative history traces the legislative process of a particular bill (about Representative and other subjects) for the main purpose of determining the legislators’ intent behind the enactment of a law to explain or clarify ambiguities in the language or the perceived meaning of that law (about Representative or other topics), or locating the current status of a bill and monitoring its progress.

State Administrative Materials and Resources

State regulations are rules and procedures promulgated by state agencies (which may apply to Representative and other topics); they are a binding source of law. In addition to promulgating regulations, state administrative boards and agencies often have judicial or quasi-judicial authority and may issue administrative decisions affecting Representative. Finding these decisions can be challenging. In many cases, researchers about Representative should check state agency web sites for their regulations, decisions, forms, and other information of interest.

State rules and regulations are found in codes of regulations and administrative codes (official compilation of all rules and regulations, organized by subject matter). Search here:

State opinions of the Attorney General (official written advisory opinions on issues of state law related to Representative when formerly requested by a designated government officer):

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