Conspiracy

Conspiracy in United States

Conspiracy Definition

(Lat. con, together, spiro, to breathe). In criminal law. A combination of two or more persons by some concerted action to accomplish some criminal or unlawful purpose, or to accomplish some Eurpose, not in itself criminal or unlawful, y criminal or unlawful means. 2 Mass. 337, 538; 4 Mete. (Mass.) Ill; 4 Wend. (N. Y.) 229; 15 N. H. 396; 5 Har. & J. (Md.) 317; 3 Serg. & R. (Pa.) 220; 12 Conn. 101; 11 Clark & F. 155; 4 Mich. 414.

Conspiracy in Foreign Legal Encyclopedias

Link Description
Conspiracy Conspiracy in the World Legal Encyclopedia.
Conspiracy Conspiracy in the European Legal Encyclopedia.
Conspiracy Conspiracy in the Asian Legal Encyclopedia.
Conspiracy Conspiracy in the UK Legal Encyclopedia.
Conspiracy Conspiracy in the Australian Legal Encyclopedia.

Back to Top

For starting research in the law of a foreign country:

Browse the American Encyclopedia of Law for Conspiracy

Scan Conspiracy in the appropriate area of law:

Link Description
Conspiracy Conspiracy in the Family Law Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conspiracy Conspiracy in the IP Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conspiracy Conspiracy in the Commercial Law Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conspiracy Conspiracy in the Criminal Law Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conspiracy Conspiracy in the Antritrust Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conspiracy Conspiracy in the Bankruptcy Law Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conspiracy Conspiracy in the Constitutional Law Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conspiracy Conspiracy in the Tax Law Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conspiracy Conspiracy in the and Finance and Banking Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conspiracy Conspiracy in the Employment and Labor Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conspiracy Conspiracy in the Personal Injury and Tort Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conspiracy Conspiracy in the Environmental Law Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.

Back to Top

Explore other Reference Works

Resource Description
Conspiracy in the Dictionaries Conspiracy in our legal dictionaries
https://lawi.us/conspiracy The URI of Conspiracy (more about URIs)
Conspiracy related entries Find related entries of Conspiracy

Back to Top

Legal Issue for Attorneys

(Lat. con, together, spiro, to breathe). In criminal law. A combination of two or more persons by some concerted action to accomplish some criminal or unlawful purpose, or to accomplish some Eurpose, not in itself criminal or unlawful, y criminal or unlawful means. 2 Mass. 337, 538; 4 Mete. (Mass.) Ill; 4 Wend. (N. Y.) 229; 15 N. H. 396; 5 Har. & J. (Md.) 317; 3 Serg. & R. (Pa.) 220; 12 Conn. 101; 11 Clark & F. 155; 4 Mich. 414.

Legal Indexes

The Index is a collection of entries to allow users to locate information in the Lawi Projects. After write down relevant words and phrases that you need, begin looking up the words and phrases using the index until you have located an applicable subject to review.

Indexes of All Encyclopedias:
A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Z

Index Description
General Index Index of general information about the Encyclopedia
Classified index Headings arranged on the basis of relations among concepts represented by headings, based on the Lawi Classification Scheme
Topical Index A comprehensive and easy guide to the topics of the legal Encyclopedia
Citation Index Index of links between citing and cited entries
Subject Index Identify and describe the subjects of the Encyclopedia
Alphabetical Index A-Z Index of all the Entries
Thematic Index Correlation of terms in a meaningful hierarchical order
Permutation Index A type of index in which significant words in the titles function as subject headings
Browse Index Browse the Encyclopedia by Index
Sitemap Index Sitemap Index, including Taxonomies

Back to Top

Notice

This definition of Conspiracy is based on The Cyclopedic Law Dictionary. This entry needs to be proofread.

Practical Information

Note: Some of this information was last updated in 1982

An agreement between two or more persons to commit a crime. All the conspirators must share the intention to accomplish, by concerted action, the act that they plan. The act the conspirators agree to do need never be done; the conspiracy itself is a crime. See aiding (in U.S. law) and abetting (in U.S. law).

(Revised by Ann De Vries)

What is Conspiracy?

For a meaning of it, read Conspiracy in the Legal Dictionary here. Browse and search more U.S. and international free legal definitions and legal terms related to Conspiracy.

Conspiracy (Civil Rights Law)

This section introduces, discusses and describes the basics of conspiracy. Then, cross references and a brief overview about Civil Rights Lawin relation to conspiracy is provided. Note that a list of bibliography resources and other aids appears at the end of this entry.

Conspiracy

In Legislation

Conspiracy in the U.S. Code: Title 18, Part I, Chapter 19

The current, permanent, in-force federal laws regulating conspiracy are compiled in the United States Code under Title 18, Part I, Chapter 19. It constitutes “prima facie” evidence of statutes relating to Crimes and Criminal Law (including conspiracy) of the United States. The readers can further narrow their legal research on the topic by chapter and subchapter.

Resources

See Also

Accomplices; Attempt; Solicitation.

Communism.

Alien and Sedition Laws ; Crime ; Justice, Department of ; Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organization Act ; Warren Commission ; Watergate ; Whiskey Rebellion .

Intrigue

Further Reading (Books)

American Law Institute. Model Penal Code: Proposed Official Draft. Philadelphia: ALI, 1962.

–. Model Penal Code: Tentative Draft No. 10. Philadelphia: ALI, 1960.

Coke, Edward. The Third Part of the Institutes of the Laws of England: Concerning High Treason, and Other Pleas of the Crown, and Criminal Causes (1641). London: E. & R. Brooke, 1797.

Developments in the Law. “Criminal Conspiracy.” Harvard Law Review 72 (1959): 920-1008.

Filvaroff, David B. “Conspiracy and the First Amendment.” University of Pennsylvania Law Review 121 (1972): 189-253.

Harno, Albert J. “Intent in Criminal Conspiracy.” University of Pennsylvania Law Review 89 (1941): 624-647.

Johnson, Phillip E. “The Unnecessary Crime of Conspiracy.” California Law Review 61 (1973): 1137-1188.

Levie, Joseph H. “Hearsay and Conspiracy: A Reexamination of the Co-conspirators’ Exception to the Hearsay Rule.” Michigan Law Review 52 (1954): 1159-1178.

Marcus, Paul. The Prosecution and Defense of Criminal Conspiracy Cases. New York: M. Bender, 1978-1990.

Mitford, Jessica. The Trial of Dr. Spock, the Rev. William Sloane Coffin, Jr., Michael Ferber, Mitchell Goodman, and Marcus Raskin. New York: Knopf, 1969.

Note. “Conspiracy: Statutory Reform since the Model Penal Code.” Columbia Law Review 75 (1975): 1122-1188.

Sayre, Francis. “Criminal Conspiracy.” Harvard Law Review 35 (1922): 393-427.

Turner, Marjorie B. S. The Early American Labor ConspiracyCases-Their Place in Labor Law: A Reinterpretation. San Diego. Calif.: San Diego State College Press, 1967.

U.S. National Commission on Reform of Federal Criminal Laws. Final Report: A Proposed New Federal Criminal Code (Title 18, United States Code). Washington, D.C.: The Commission, 1971.

–. Working Papers, vol. 1. Washington, D.C.: The Commission, 1970.

Wellington, Harry H. Labor and the Legal Process. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1968.

Wright, Robert S. The Law of Criminal Conspiracies and Agreements. Philadelphia: Blackstone, 1887.

Bassano, Joseph J. Conspiracy. Vol. 16 of American Jurisprudence. 2d ed. Rochester, N.Y.: Lawyers Co-operative Publishing, 1998.

Davis, Beth Allison, and Josh Vitullo. “Federal Criminal Conspiracy.” American Criminal Law Review 38 (2001): 777-817. An annual survey of the state of the law.

Fenster, Mark. Conspiracy Theories: Secrecy and Power in American Culture. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1999.

Forkosch, Morris D. “The Doctrine of Criminal Conspiracy and Its Modern Application to Labor.” Texas Law Review 40 (1962): 303-338, 473-508.

Goldstein, Abraham S. “Conspiracy to Defraud the United States.” Yale Law Journal 68 (1959): 405-463.

Selz, Shirley A. “Conspiracy Law in Theory and in Practice: Federal Conspiracy Prosecutions in Chicago.” American Journal of Criminal Law 5 (1977): 35-71.

M. SusanMurnane

Further Reading (Articles)

Conspiracy Theories: Public Arguments as Coded Social Critiques: A Rhetorical Analysis of the TWA Flight 800 Conspiracy Theories, Argumentation and Advocacy; June 22, 2002; Miller, Shane

Conspiracy Rising: Conspiracy Thinking and American Public Life, Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA); December 1, 2012; Bronson, Zachary

“Conspiracy Theory” and Sound Argumentation: The Method of Cocaine Politics for Resolving “Conflicting World Views” (Excerpt), ETC.: A Review of General Semantics; April 1, 2004; Bouknight, Jon

Conspiracy Against Blacks? Sure, Why Not?, The Washington Post; December 23, 1989; William Raspberry

Conspiracy Theories: Secrecy and Power in American Culture, Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA); June 1, 2009; Neal, Arthur G

HORNER: Conspiracy theories revel in their vagueness, improbability, The Gazette (Colorado Springs, CO); January 25, 2011; John Horner;

Conspiracy in the French Revolution.(Book review), Canadian Journal of History; December 22, 2009; Jainchill, Andrew

Conspiracy: How the Paranoid Style Flourishes and Where It Comes From. (book reviews), History Today; August 1, 1998; Foss, Clive

The Conspiracy Conspiracy ; Five Myths That THEY Want You to Believe. by Jesse Walker | Illustrations by Wesley Bedrosian, The Boston Globe (Boston, MA); October 20, 2013; Walker, Jesse

Conspiracy Theories, St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture; January 1, 2000

Criminal Conspiracy, Encyclopedia of the American Constitution; January 1, 2000

Tying Conspiracies, William and Mary Law Review; May 1, 2007; Leslie, Christopher R.

Federal criminal conspiracy, American Criminal Law Review; April 1, 2003; Casey, Carrie Marino, Lisa

Conspiracy doc compelling… or is it?, Winnipeg Free Press; October 20, 2011; TV, Brad Oswald Watching

Conspiracy Theories in African American Culture: A Concept Analysis, Journal of Theory Construction and Testing; April 1, 2009; Harris, Allyssa L

Conspiracy Theory, The Yale Law Journal; April 1, 2003; Katyal, Neal Kumar

Evaluating Conspiracy: Narrative, Argument, and Ideology in Lincoln’s “House Divided” Speech, Argumentation and Advocacy; September 22, 2005; Pfau, Michael William

Federal Criminal Conspiracy, American Criminal Law Review; April 1, 2006; Siegel, Richard

Conspiracy, Encyclopedia of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity; January 1, 2005

Drug Conspiracies, The FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin; June 1, 1999; Hendrie, Edward M.

Conspiracy in State Statute Topics

Introduction to Conspiracy (State statute topic)

The purpose of Conspiracy is to provide a broad appreciation of the Conspiracy legal topic. Select from the list of U.S. legal topics for information (other than Conspiracy).

Resources

Further Reading

Conspiracy: Open and Free Legal Research of US Law

Federal Primary Materials

The U.S. federal government system consists of executive, legislative, and judicial branches, each of which creates information that can be the subject of legal research about Conspiracy. This part provides references, in relation to Conspiracy, to the legislative process, the federal judiciary, and the primary sources of federal law (cases, statutes, and regulations).

Federal primary materials about Conspiracy by content types:

Laws and Regulations

US Constitution
Federal Statutory Codes and Legislation

Federal Case Law and Court Materials

U.S. Courts of Appeals
United States courts of appeals, inclouding bankruptcy courts and bankcruptcy appellate panels:

Federal Administrative Materials and Resources

Presidential Materials

Materials that emanate from the President’s lawmaking function include executive orders for officers in departments and agencies and proclamations for announcing ceremonial or commemorative policies. Presidential materials available include:

Executive Materials

Federal Legislative History Materials

Legislative history traces the legislative process of a particular bill (about Conspiracy and other subjects) for the main purpose of determining the legislators’ intent behind the enactment of a law to explain or clarify ambiguities in the language or the perceived meaning of that law (about Conspiracy or other topics), or locating the current status of a bill and monitoring its progress.

State Administrative Materials and Resources

State regulations are rules and procedures promulgated by state agencies (which may apply to Conspiracy and other topics); they are a binding source of law. In addition to promulgating regulations, state administrative boards and agencies often have judicial or quasi-judicial authority and may issue administrative decisions affecting Conspiracy. Finding these decisions can be challenging. In many cases, researchers about Conspiracy should check state agency web sites for their regulations, decisions, forms, and other information of interest.

State rules and regulations are found in codes of regulations and administrative codes (official compilation of all rules and regulations, organized by subject matter). Search here:

State opinions of the Attorney General (official written advisory opinions on issues of state law related to Conspiracy when formerly requested by a designated government officer):

Tools and Forms

Law in Other Regions

*This resource guide is updated frequently. However, if you notice something is wrong or not working, or any resources that should be added, please notify us in any of the "Leave a Comment" area.

Leave a Comment