Conclusion

Conclusion in United States

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Conclusion Definition

(Lat. con claudere, to shut together). The close; the end. , In Pleading. In declarations, that part which follows the statement of the cause of action. In personal or mixed actions, where the object is to recover damages, the conclusion is, properly, to the damage of the plaintiff, etc. Comyn, Dig. “Pleader,” c. 84; 10 Coke, 1156. The form was anciently, in the king’s bench, “To the damage of the said A. B., and thereupon he brings suit;” in the exchequer, “To the damage,” etc., “whereby he is the less able to satisfy our said lord the king the debts which he owes his said majesty at his exchequer, and therefore he brings his suit.” 1 Chit. PI. 356-358. In pleas, the conclusion is either to the country, which must be the case when an issue is tendered, that is, whenever the plaintiff’s material statements are contradicted, or by verification, which must be the case when new matter is introduced. Every plea in bar, it is said, must have its proper conclusion. All the formal parts of pleadings have been much modified by statute in the various states and in England within the last few years. In Practice. Making the last argument or address to the court or jury. The party on whom the onus probandi is cast, in general, has the conclusion. In Remedies. An estoppel; a bar; the act of a man by which he has confessed a matter or thing which he can no longer deny. For example, the sheriff is concluded by his return to a writ, and therefore, if upon a capias he return cepi corpus, he cannot afterwards show that he did not arrest the defendant, but is concluded by his return. See Plowd. 276b; 3 Thomas, Co. Litt. 600.

Conclusion in Foreign Legal Encyclopedias

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Conclusion Conclusion in the World Legal Encyclopedia.
Conclusion Conclusion in the European Legal Encyclopedia.
Conclusion Conclusion in the Asian Legal Encyclopedia.
Conclusion Conclusion in the UK Legal Encyclopedia.
Conclusion Conclusion in the Australian Legal Encyclopedia.

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Conclusion Conclusion in the Family Law Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conclusion Conclusion in the IP Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conclusion Conclusion in the Commercial Law Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conclusion Conclusion in the Criminal Law Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conclusion Conclusion in the Antritrust Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conclusion Conclusion in the Bankruptcy Law Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conclusion Conclusion in the Constitutional Law Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conclusion Conclusion in the Tax Law Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conclusion Conclusion in the and Finance and Banking Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conclusion Conclusion in the Employment and Labor Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conclusion Conclusion in the Personal Injury and Tort Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.
Conclusion Conclusion in the Environmental Law Portal of the American Encyclopedia of Law.

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Conclusion in the Dictionaries Conclusion in our legal dictionaries
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Legal Issue for Attorneys

(Lat. con claudere, to shut together). The close; the end. , In Pleading. In declarations, that part which follows the statement of the cause of action. In personal or mixed actions, where the object is to recover damages, the conclusion is, properly, to the damage of the plaintiff, etc. Comyn, Dig. “Pleader,” c. 84; 10 Coke, 1156. The form was anciently, in the king’s bench, “To the damage of the said A. B., and thereupon he brings suit;” in the exchequer, “To the damage,” etc., “whereby he is the less able to satisfy our said lord the king the debts which he owes his said majesty at his exchequer, and therefore he brings his suit.” 1 Chit. PI. 356-358. In pleas, the conclusion is either to the country, which must be the case when an issue is tendered, that is, whenever the plaintiff’s material statements are contradicted, or by verification, which must be the case when new matter is introduced. Every plea in bar, it is said, must have its proper conclusion. All the formal parts of pleadings have been much modified by statute in the various states and in England within the last few years. In Practice. Making the last argument or address to the court or jury. The party on whom the onus probandi is cast, in general, has the conclusion. In Remedies. An estoppel; a bar; the act of a man by which he has confessed a matter or thing which he can no longer deny. For example, the sheriff is concluded by his return to a writ, and therefore, if upon a capias he return cepi corpus, he cannot afterwards show that he did not arrest the defendant, but is concluded by his return. See Plowd. 276b; 3 Thomas, Co. Litt. 600.

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This definition of Conclusion is based on The Cyclopedic Law Dictionary. This entry needs to be proofread.

Conclusion in Environmental Law

Over the last three decades, environmental issues have risen to the top of our consciousness. Clean water and air, freedom from negative long-term effects of chemicals we use, and responsible approaches to creating and disposing of waste have become as important to us as our personally owned resources. Whether the reasons for our concern are selfish or altruistic, we are beginning to understand that human activity has had a significant impact on the world.

From one perspective, we humans have been an extraordinarily successful species. We have improved our quality of life and remained ever on the move, ever growing in number. We have used our resources as if we were buying on credit, spending freely with no thought to how we would pay the bill.

Many other species have come and gone on the earth over its long history, and it is doubtful that any of them knew why. Humans alone are capable of seeing the direction we are heading as a species. Within the last few decades, we have attempted, through environmental legislation, to correct our course. But it is difficult to convince anyone of the need to change practices that have short-term benefit until the price of ignoring their effects is fully revealed. Thus, most of our environmental statutes are reactive; they grow directly out of environmental disasters we have created.

Fortunately we have a wonderful planet that has given us life and forgiven us much. We can see our footsteps and imagine the future. The spirit of international cooperation in addressing common environmental issues will grow because it must. If we continue to address our environmental problems responsibly, we will leave a better world to our children, and they, to theirs.
Based on “Environment and the Law. A Dictionary”.

Conclusion: Open and Free Legal Research of US Law

Federal Primary Materials

The U.S. federal government system consists of executive, legislative, and judicial branches, each of which creates information that can be the subject of legal research about Conclusion. This part provides references, in relation to Conclusion, to the legislative process, the federal judiciary, and the primary sources of federal law (cases, statutes, and regulations).

Federal primary materials about Conclusion by content types:

Laws and Regulations

US Constitution
Federal Statutory Codes and Legislation

Federal Case Law and Court Materials

U.S. Courts of Appeals
United States courts of appeals, inclouding bankruptcy courts and bankcruptcy appellate panels:

Federal Administrative Materials and Resources

Presidential Materials

Materials that emanate from the President’s lawmaking function include executive orders for officers in departments and agencies and proclamations for announcing ceremonial or commemorative policies. Presidential materials available include:

Executive Materials

Federal Legislative History Materials

Legislative history traces the legislative process of a particular bill (about Conclusion and other subjects) for the main purpose of determining the legislators’ intent behind the enactment of a law to explain or clarify ambiguities in the language or the perceived meaning of that law (about Conclusion or other topics), or locating the current status of a bill and monitoring its progress.

State Administrative Materials and Resources

State regulations are rules and procedures promulgated by state agencies (which may apply to Conclusion and other topics); they are a binding source of law. In addition to promulgating regulations, state administrative boards and agencies often have judicial or quasi-judicial authority and may issue administrative decisions affecting Conclusion. Finding these decisions can be challenging. In many cases, researchers about Conclusion should check state agency web sites for their regulations, decisions, forms, and other information of interest.

State rules and regulations are found in codes of regulations and administrative codes (official compilation of all rules and regulations, organized by subject matter). Search here:

State opinions of the Attorney General (official written advisory opinions on issues of state law related to Conclusion when formerly requested by a designated government officer):

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